Myles Brand Wakes Up

I damn near fell off the couch tonight when I read the following quote from NCAA president Myles Brand – known on this blog as White Man From Another Planet – who was addressing the NCAA annual convention’s attendees today: “We’re not anywhere close to where we need to be in football. I’m encouraged that coaches of color are appearing as finalists for positions, but seven out of 119, that’s just too darn low.”

Ya think?!

Props to Myles for finally speaking publicly on the dearth of opportunities for non-white coached – forget actually hiring them – in major-college football. I still think the NCAA should impose its version of the NFL’s Rooney Rule, perhaps docking scholarships from schools that do not even consider non-white candidates. (i.e. Alabama) But granted, speaking out is a start. We’ll see.

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11 thoughts on “Myles Brand Wakes Up

  1. Derek Wright says:

    Sounds good in theory but he may be just blowing smoke up our butts.

  2. What always KILLS me is that when black coaches get a chance at an NCAA school, it tends to be at a crappy school. Temple. Mississippi State. Michigan (ain’t had a heart since Bubba Smith’s hair was natural) State. Just gawd awful schools. Or they have to rebuild: Ty at Stanford and now Washington. Speaking of Ty, how come Weis isn’t under the bus for losing every game to every legit Top 25 team they played this year? But that’s another subject.

  3. Tony says:

    I’m sorry but why does there have to be special rules for non-white coaches. If they’re the ones that want to be treated equally, they should go into an interview like any other person, ridiculous that you HAVE to interview a black coach just because he’s black. What if there was only 6 interviews, one of them HAD to be a black guy even though he wasn’t qualified and there were more than 6 qualified white guys. You’re taking a chance off of a guy that is qualified just because a black guy HAD to be interviewed. Just ridiculous.

  4. You assume that the person black is unqualified, which is a common fallacy. A Charlie Strong, who has been a defensive co-ordinator at most of the major SEC schools and has consistently produced Top 10 defenses, is OVERLY qualified. And that’s the problem. The onus is often put on the black coach to prove their qualifications, while the white coach is seen as being given a chance, if young, or a grizzled vet, if a retread. My argument is that there are hundreds of mediocre white coaches plying their trade in the NCAA, while excellent black coaches aren’t even given the chance to interview. And that’s why when the gatekeeper refuses to interview black coaches because they are black (and please don’t rebut that ADs just want victories no matter what skin color. That’s not true and the numbers prove it), then the gatekeeper needs an incentive or penalty to force them to open the gate.

  5. Mike says:

    “Speaking of Ty, how come Weis isn’t under the bus for losing every game to every legit Top 25 team they played this year? But that’s another subject.”

    Because Weiss finished with a winning record, made use of the incredible quarterback Ty had been mismanaging, and got us into two bowls that never had .com after their names. Willingham’s record after two years: 11-11. Weiss’s record in the same time frame: 19-6. See a difference?

    I’m sick of the “Notre Dame are a bunch of ignorant racists” shit. Tyrone Willingham is a bad football coach. He did not put the necessary effort into recruiting, he did not adequately recruit both sides of the ball, and he routinely lost games to schools that Notre Dame should have rolled over. He was terrible at managing the clock (although not worse at that than Davie) and he made poor play-calling decisions. He regularly displayed a complete lack of urgency in games. He…is…a…baaaaaad… coach. Simple enough?

  6. BTW, get your facts straight, or the rest of your argument falls apart. Ty Willingham’s record after two years: 15 wins, 9 losses. Like most coaches, he was playing with another coaches players. Quinn, and the rest of Ty’s recruits were freshman, which would explain their mediocre record his second year.

    Charlie Weis: 0-5 versus Top 10 competition. Average margin of defeat in these game: 16 points. We’re not about to call good ole Charlie a genius are we?

    I thought Notre Dame was a powerhouse? In fact, they are a paper tiger. As I stated earlier, they beat up on the military, struggle past middling Pac and Big Ten schools ( should have lost against Michigan State and UCLA) and have gotten blasted NINE straight times in bowl games because they don’t deserve to play in the bowls they’ve been invited to. Ironically, each time Notre Dame is invited to a BCS game, it’s like throwing the Christians to the lions (or Beavers, Tigers, Buckeyes, Wolfpack, Yellow Jackets, Seminoles, Buffaloes, you get the idea). And before you say it, I’m Catholic.

  7. Daryl says:

    The late great Eddie Robinson of Grambling , would have been successful in any top notch division I program. Why wasn’t he ever offered a head coaches job at Purdue or Nebraska? Was it because of talent or color? An intelligent answer would be because he was African American. There are talented, gifted, and qualified African American coaches who will NEVER be offered a head coaches position in any of these elite institutions until God make it so. Shame on you Mr. Brand. I see that you are really making an effort.

  8. Kevin says:

    What always KILLS me is that when black coaches get a chance at an NCAA school, it tends to be at a crappy school. Temple. Mississippi State. Michigan (ain’t had a heart since Bubba Smith’s hair was natural) State. Just gawd awful schools. Or they have to rebuild: Ty at Stanford and now Washington. Speaking of Ty, how come Weis isn’t under the bus for losing every game to every legit Top 25 team they played this year? But that’s another subject.

    All those “gawd awful schools.”

    Wake Forest, Louisville, Oklahoma, Oklahoma St. UCLA, Notre Dame, Washington, Kansas St. Michigan St. Mississippi St. Miami.

    Look at the list of all those “it tends to be a crappy schools” list.

    Imagine a coach having a job to rebuld a program. I guess that “or they have to rebuild” job is reserve for black coaches. Just think what would happen if a white head coach had to rebuild a program like, Louisville, Wake Forest, Rutgers, Oklahoma, Texas, Cal, or even USC.

  9. Professional sports, built on the “Just win, baby” model, has done far better than college sports when it comes to hiring African American coaches. Wins produce revenue and keep owners happy. And happy owners give raises not pink slips. Best man wins. Nothing else matters, especially not the color of the coach’s skin. Perhaps the lack of pretense in professional sports leads to fairness.

    NCAA president Myles Brand is correct to point out the problem, but his power is limited to persuasion. He can make all the right arguments, but ultimately no one can stop athletic departments from acting like country clubs.

    The NFL adopted the Rooney Rule which requires teams to interview minority candidates for head coaching vacancies and imposes significant financial penalties teams who do not follow. Professional sports leagues want to be viewed a positive member of the community, but decisions are driven by economics, not by altruism or some stated higher purpose.

  10. Josh says:

    Charlie Weis won 3 super bowls in 4 years with New England. Blacks don’t get hired because they’re intellectually inferior. It is a scentific fact. Please read “The Bell Curve.” Black coaches get hired just because they’re black.

  11. Jeff Myers says:

    OK Notre Dame isn’t racist, but would Weiss have been fired with Willigham’s record and, if so, would Willingham be retained at one and eight after a loss to Navy?

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