Griffin a Victim of NFL’s “Win Now” Mentality

griffininpain1Robert Griffin III (I’m not calling him RGIII again until he’s healthy) had surgery today. According to various reports doctors repaired a torn LCL and examined at previously injured ACL. Rehabilitation is likely to take months.

Like millions, I watched in pain as Griffin limped through the final desperate minutes of Washington’s playoff loss to the Seattle Seahawks. At one juncture, as he gamely–but with a clear gimp–tried to lead a Redskins comeback, I tweeted “Get RGIII outta there!” But Mike Shanahan didn’t pay me any mind. And soon thereafter the future–hopefully–of the franchise, and maybe the most popular man in the nation’s capital, was carted off the field.

My immediate reaction was that Shanahan’s fateful decision was to blame. And it is.

And despite the esteemed Redskins team physician Dr James Andrews’s public moonwalking, he was also on the sideline, too, as Griffin remained on the field like a hobbled doe in the sights of a hungry pride.

Yet, this is football. Check that, this is the NFL, where the lives and fortunes of so many rest on moments of success or failure, of grandeur or defeat, of desperation. It was easy for me to think about getting the young quarterback out of there, just as hindsight has prompted millions of others to say, Of course he shouldn’t have been in there!

But my job wasn’t on the line. Not my livelihood. Shanahan was in the moment and that “moment” said win now.

NFL moments are not about tomorrow.

And that may cost the Redskins the quarterback who would have saved the franchise.

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One thought on “Griffin a Victim of NFL’s “Win Now” Mentality

  1. wkb206 says:

    Amen, Roy! You are speaking the truth, but the real question is whether power is listening. Let’s hope that the outcry over this disgrace pricks up their ears. A second question also asserts itself: can a young man with a golden future like Robert Griffin III recognize his predicament, raise his hand and take himself out and be respected and admired for making such a difficult choice? When the system in which they play fails them, it appears that our young athletes should be appropriately selfish. There’s a difference between playing hurt – a reality in virtually all professional sports – and playing so hurt that one’s career is on the line. Let’s hope that our current and future prodigies understand this and will make different and better choices as they reflect on this sad lesson that we’ve all learned….

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